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Aeolian Talks: Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & GirlsJump to Info for

With Special Guests

Tamara Bernard Jump to Info for Tamara Bernard

Wednesday February 13, 2019
7:00 pm   |  Doors Open @ 6:00 pm
Free Admission. (No tickets needed)   

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Headliner

Aeolian Talks: Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls

atlohsa.com/

Join us on Wednesday, February 13th for Aeolian Talks: Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls. A gathering held in memory of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, two spirited, boys and men.

Hosted by Atlohsa’s anti human trafficking program, Okaadenige and presented in partnership with the local Indigenous community, the evening will feature various panelists that will focus on the importance of MMIWG, provide personal stories from those affected & also highlight some of the critical services available in London & area.

The night will feature keynote speaker, Tamara Bernard.

Tamara Bernard is from Kiasheke Zaaging Anishinaabek (Gull Bay First Nation). She is an experienced educator with a demonstrated history of working in the higher education industry. She has been an Indigenous advocate for over 10 years and carries a wealth of experience and involvement within Indigenous relations across various communities. As a skilled public speaker, storyteller, facilitator, consultant, researcher, and capacity builder, Tamara’s passion is to share stories and teachings to other people. She has presented at TEDxTalks ( We are More than Murdered and Missing, 2016), academic conferences, regional strategic chief and council gatherings, national webinars, and over 40 Indigenous communities across Canada. Additionally, Tamara has worked with the CTV See Me Project, Where are the Missing Children Art Series, in addition to other works such as: We are More than Murdered and Missing, Stolen Sisters-Stolen Mothers-Stolen Communities, Indigenous Yoga: Reclaiming our Spirit, Building our Bundles: Anishinaabeikwe Stories from Robinson Superior region, I am Story/ies – Indigenous women storytelling to Heal, Reclaim, & Empower, and Restor(y)ing through Indigenous Research.

The night will also feature The “See Me” exhibit, which features the artwork of London’s Sean Couchie, and is an art installation located at Atlohsa’s downtown location but will be displayed at Aeolian Hall for this event. Its purpose is to continue the conversation about the Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls across Canada & the legacy of Residential Schools.

Doors open at 6:00pm and we encourage people to come early to network, share stories & meet some of the staff of Atlohsa.

Official program will start at 7:00pm.

Free Event. No tickets required.

**Mental health support & Elder support will be available for those needing it.**

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Special Guest

Tamara Bernard

Tamara Bernard is from Kiasheke Zaaging Anishinaabek (Gull Bay First Nation). She is an experienced educator with a demonstrated history of working in the higher education industry. She has been an Indigenous advocate for over 10 years and carries a wealth of experience and involvement within Indigenous relations across various communities. As a skilled public speaker, storyteller, facilitator, consultant, researcher, and capacity builder, Tamara’s passion is to share stories and teachings to other people. She has presented at TEDxTalks ( We are More than Murdered and Missing, 2016), academic conferences, regional strategic chief and council gatherings, national webinars, and over 40 Indigenous communities across Canada. Tamara has dedicated her research to her late great grandmother, Jane Bernard, (with a Master’s thesis titled: We are More than Murdered and Missing, 2017) who was taken in 1966 along with Doreen Hardy. She employs Indigenous research methods to consider the ways that the media narratives and knowledge on MMIWG often focus on death of the women, which takes away from the lived realities of these women and girls. Tamara believes that the impact on the families and communities are much more significant than the one violent event that took their lives. Through the course of her research, Tamara finally learned about her great grandmother beyond her death, and along the way worked to deconstruct the hegemony of westernized knowledge in order to emphasize the Indigenous woman story, derived from relationships established with Land, Place, Humans, Ceremony, and Spirit World. Tamara is also known for her work on the board of directors of Nokiiwin Tribal Council, Indigenous Education at Lakehead University, and Ontario Native Women’s Association. Additionally, Tamara has worked with the CTV See Me Project, Where are the Missing Children Art Series, in addition to other works such as: We are More than Murdered and Missing, Stolen Sisters-Stolen Mothers-Stolen Communities, Indigenous Yoga: Reclaiming our Spirit, Building our Bundles: Anishinaabeikwe Stories from Robinson Superior region, I am Story/ies – Indigenous women storytelling to Heal, Reclaim, & Empower, and Restor(y)ing through Indigenous Research.

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